3 Kindle Fire Apps to Teach Kids Money Skills

kindle fire kids apps

The world economy lately has given us all a quick and brutal lesson in financial planning. Namely, it is important to understand how your money works and how to best safe for the future. We are learning more and more about being prepared, and how bad it can be if we are unprepared when economic hard times hit. It turns out that the best time to learn about managing money is when you are still a kid. We aren’t born as savers or spenders, we learn from examples.

 

Most of us only have the example of our parents, and possibly we pick up some tips from our bank or credit card company, if we’re lucky. But today there are so many resources out there it is a shame not to take advantage of them. Educational tools are evolving all the time, and a simple reward system isn’t necessarily enough. You can teach your kid to save their allowance so they can afford to buy a toy they want, but learning to save for the long term is more complex than that.

 

Fortunately, there are some great Kindle Fire Apps that teach kids about the importance of saving and managing money, although they don’t necessarily make your kid feel like they’re experiencing a lecture on the topic. Below are reviews on some of the money skills Kindle Fire Apps for kids on the market.

 

Kindle fire kids apps1. My First Money

Price: $0.99

My First Money - Aprendium

This application is the most basic way to teach your kids about the use of money. There aren’t many options in the Kindle Fire for kids app store that teach them to add and subtract money based on coin values. This app does provide a nice skill lesson, and there are some fun aspects for the child, such as being able to add up and use coins to purchase things. Sadly, there are very few things to keep a child engaged in this app after the first few rounds. For just .99 cents you aren’t losing a lot if you buy this app, but don’t expect miracles with these types of Kindle Fire Apps for Kids.

 

Beneficial Features:
• Basic counting and adding
• Teaches familiarity with coins and money
• Teaches familiarity with purchasing items for prices

 

Kindle fire kids apps2. Coin Calculator

Price: $0.99

Again, for a .99c Kindle Fire Game for kids, you can’t really go wrong. This app teaches children to count coins as well as add and subtract. The math learning involved is basic but specific to the values of our coin system. Children learn to us a plus or minus sign to add and subtract, priming them for their first experiences with other math. This application has an added benefit, in that you can create your own “store” that your child can visit to shop with their money. However, the only thing it teaches is how to add and subtract coins – nothing fancy and certainly nothing you can’t do on your own with a few real coins. If you are getting something for your Kindle Fire for kids, you want them to stay interested.

 

Beneficial Features:
• Demonstrates adding and subtracting
• Focuses on the value of coins and how they relate to each other
• Allows for shopping and learning about using coins.

 

Kindle fire kids apps3. Peter Pig’s Money Counter

Price: Free

Peter Pig’s Money Counter is one of the only Kindle Fire games for kids that focuses on money. Surprisingly, this is also a free app (Developed by Visa Inc) and kids tend to have more fun with this than the other, paid options. Where the other money skills Kindle Fire apps for kids don’t have sound or more than one way to participate with money, this one had a few features that keep kids’ attention a bit better. There are change sounds and when your child is successful there are rewarding cha-ching! noises. If you want to teach your children about coins and adding up money, as well as saving and using those coins, this is probably the best Kindle Fire for kids option. And of course, the price cannot be beat.

 

Beneficial Features:
• Fun sounds and actions that kids like
• Teaches coin identification
• Teaches adding and subtracting of coin amounts
• Free

 

Photo credit with thanks to Nicholas Erwin